Social Wearables

Introduction to the intricate relationship between the human body and emerging technologies

Workshop Dates: July 25th – 29th, 2016

Keywords: wearables, wearable computing, wearable electronics, soft circuits, social, wireless

Description:
Wearables are suddenly everywhere. Designers, artists, and technologists need to consider what should live in bodyspace and why. An increasing number of technologies orbit the human form – new devices and computing capabilities that live in, on, and around the body. But many of these technologies focus primarily on the individual. How can wearable technology assist, affect, and subvert the ways in which we relate to each other and the world around us?

The focus of this workshop is social wearables – wearables that are able to communicate with each other and with larger systems. Through the use of physical computing skills and wearable design techniques participants will create experiments and body-based projects that specifically engage in and address how we as humans relate and communicate.

This course aims will give participants the opportunity to develop basic skills in working with electronics is a wearable format. This will include engaging with the hardware, software, wireless communication, and construction and fabrication.

The primary tools will include Arduino, Processing, and standard and non-traditional conductive materials such as conductive fabric and thread.

Learning expectations:
This course uses a hands-on approach to create a studio environment of exploration, development, and testing of existing and emerging social wearable technologies. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Critically consider and engage with emerging wearable technologies and tools.
  • Position their work contextually in relation to the past and contemporary wearable projects and products.
  • Assess and implement technologies needed to take a wearable electronics project idea from concept to completion.

Prerequisites: Experience with basic electronics is helpful but not required.

Faculty:
Kate Hartman (OCAD University)